Posts Tagged ‘Data Communication’

A list of problems associated with the wrist

October 19th, 2022

This article looks at some of the most common wrist injuries incurred and rehabilitation through the use of a wrist support in conjunction with other methods.

Sprained Wrist

This is one of the most common forms of wrist injuries and something we will all encounter at some stage,Guest Posting as a result of landing awkwardly on the joint or picking up something too heavy. A wrist injury has varying grades attributed to it, from one to three depending on the severity of the injury. The sprain itself results from damage to the ligaments within the joint, which are tough bands of tissue connecting the bones and responsible for overall stabilisation.

A grade one injury is minor and you should expect to recover within a few days following rest and the use of ice to help manage any inflammation and pain, whereas a grade three injury may require physiotherapy and even surgery to rectify the problem.

A wrist support can also be worn following a sprained wrist, offering an additional level of support for the joint. There are different wrist support products available depending on the nature of the condition you wish to manage, from a material based support to something rigid and preventing movement of the joint.

For a sprained wrist a standard material based wrist support will suffice, offering the patient compression to help manage inflammation and pain as well as offering a degree of support to enhance mobility. There are some manufacturers offering breathable material which not only conforms to the skin and joint but is designed to be discreet and worn under clothing to allow a person to carry on as normal.

Repetitive Strain Injuries

Repetitive strain injury (RSI) is often referred to as work-related upper limb disorder, a condition describing pain in muscles, nerves and tendons resulting from overuse. The condition is not just limited to the wrist and can affect the forearm, elbow, neck and even shoulders. Patients typically notice swelling and stiffness in affected areas, which can be very uncomfortable and limit mobility.

RSI can be defined by two different types, with the first being something a doctor is able to diagnose based on the symptoms displayed. The second is classed as non-specific pain syndrome where a doctor is unable to determine the root cause of the problem experienced due to the lack of obvious symptoms.

A type one RSI can be the result of conditions such as bursitis, carpal tunnel syndrome and tendonitis. Bursitis is a common complaint of the knee, elbow and shoulder whereas the other two can impact on the wrist joint.

Life Art Models and Hand Wrist Pains

April 7th, 2022

Most people think that wrist pain comes from high-repetition of unnatural motion, such as those which occur at the grocery store moving items across the scanner at the checkout counter or those who spend all day typing on a key-board. It’s not that those things are not problematic or cause carpal tunnel, research proves they do, but what people fail to realize is there are so many other things which cause hand and wrist pain. I’d like to tell you about one you hadn’t yet considered; that of a life art model, attempting to hold a pose for a long-period of time for a group of painters. Let’s talk.

Try this sometime; sit on the ground and lean back, then turn your body slightly sideways and put one arm stretched out, and then bring it in another 8 inches so your elbow is bent. Next take the move your hand and rotate it 120-degrees and spread out your fingers in your hand. Then take a book in your other hand put your thumb in the center of the book and hold open the pages. Put your elbow on that arm facing forward and slightly angle your hand backwards. Now hold that pose for 30 minutes. How does that make you feel?

I am sure you are able to hold that pose just because this is a challenge and you didn’t want to look silly. But go ahead and hold it for another 30 minutes after taking a 10 minute pause. Well, now you know what it’s like to have hand and wrist pain as a life art model. If you do these things every day, eventually you will have a real challenge, and yes you will eventually adapt and your muscles will get stronger, but you will also have problems with your joints, wrists, and hands. You might think that being a life art model is easy because you just sit there and make money for doing nothing.

Still, believe me, it’s much more difficult. There are ergonomically ideal positions to sit in or lie in, and it is tricky to find a good pose that you can hold for a long duration of time without getting sore, tired, or having muscle cramps or pain afterwards. What’s the answer? Start out with the simpler poses and as you get better at it you can work into the more difficult poses without injuring yourself. Please consider all this and think on it.